Sunday, March 31, 2013

Parenthood

Elder M Russel Ballard, THE GREATEST GENERATION OF MISSIONARIES, October 2002 General Conference
"Some fathers don’t think they have the right to ask worthiness questions of their children. They think that is the purview of the bishop alone. Fathers, not only do you have the right to know the worthiness of your children, you have the responsibility. It is your duty to know how your children are doing with regards to their spiritual well-being and progression. You need to monitor carefully the issues and concerns they share with you. Ask specific questions of your children regarding their worthiness, and refuse to settle for anything less than specific answers.

"Too often our bishops have to instruct youth to talk to their parents about problems they are having. That procedure should actually flow the other direction. Parents should be so intimately aware of what is going on in their children’s lives that they know about the problems before the bishop does. They should be counseling with their children and going with them to their bishops if that becomes necessary for complete repentance. As divinely appointed judges in Israel, the bishop and the stake president determine worthiness and resolve concerns on behalf of the Church; but, fathers, you have an eternal responsibility for the spiritual welfare of your children. Please assume your rightful place as counselor, adviser, and priesthood leader in preparing your sons to bear the Melchizedek Priesthood and to serve as missionaries."

Bishop Robert D Hales, How Will Our Children Remember Us?, General Conference October 1993
“If the example we have received from our parents was not good, it is our responsibility to break the cycle.

“Certainly parents will make mistakes in their parenting process, but through humility, faith, prayer, and study, each person can learn a better way and in so doing bless the lives of family members now and teach correct traditions for the generations that follow.”

Elder Dallin H. Oaks, Fundamental to Our Faith, Ensign January 2011

The power to create mortal life is the most exalted power God has given His children. The use of this creative power was mandated in the first commandment to “be fruitful, and multiply” (Genesis 1:28). Another important commandment forbade its misuse: “Thou shalt not commit adultery” (Exodus 20:14), and “ye should abstain from fornication” (1 Thessalonians 4:3). The emphasis we place on this law of chastity is explained by our understanding of the purpose of our procreative powers in the accomplishment of God’s plan.


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